Students, educators benefit from growing food

Print Article

In the last 20 years, small schools facing budget cuts often removed elective classes. This left skills like cooking and growing fruits and vegetables unlearned.

Center for Rural Affairs’ Greenhouse to Cafeteria program has been a solution for schools that have faced those decisions in the past. Not only does it fill a hole left in the curriculum, it also means healthier foods are served at lunch.

The program allows students to grow fruits and vegetables in school greenhouses. After harvesting, students deliver the produce to the cafeteria. Cafeteria staff then have an opportunity to buy and use the fresh food in the lunch program.

Growing food is an experience both students and educators benefit from. Hands-on activities turn pulling weeds and snapping beans into math and science lessons.

Exploring the food system teaches insights that may go untaught. Students have shared with us they feel empowered to know they are taking care of the healthy menu items.

In some schools, the summer months are being used to teach skills needed to run a market stand. These programs are helping build entrepreneurs, farmers, and experts - both culinary and in the food system.

Greenhouse to Cafeteria pilot schools are investing in serving healthier options to rural students’ bodies and minds. These schools are providing experiences in careers youth may want to explore. Schools are also serving up a new dialogue about the community and rural America; one where students can envision their future self inside of, rather than leaving.

Learn more about the Center’s Greenhouse to Cafeteria program by visiting www.cfra.org/g2c.

Sandra Renner represents the Center for Rural Affairs, a private, nonprofit organization working to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities through action oriented programs addressing social, economic, and environmental issues.

Print Article

Read More Editorial

Idaho surges, but more work lies ahead

January 17, 2018 at 6:00 am | Bonner County Daily Bee Greetings from our state capitol! The state legislative session for 2018 is underway and has just completed its first week as I write this. The session will run through to the end of March and the 10...

Comments

Read More

What’s a breath of clean air worth

January 10, 2018 at 6:00 am | Priest River Times Last week, I drove through Lewiston on my way back home following the holidays. An inversion had settled over Lewiston on New Year’s Eve, trapping stinky and nauseating gas that the Clearwater Paper ...

Comments

Read More

5G technology could impact health, privacy, rights

January 03, 2018 at 6:00 am | Bonner County Daily Bee The next generation of wireless cellular technology, also known as 5G, is scheduled to be rolled out in two years. If released as planned, 5G would blanket the entire country with extremely high freq...

Comments

Read More

HiTest plan needs rigorous scrutiny, transparency

December 27, 2017 at 6:00 am | Priest River Times Our firm represents Citizens Against the Newport Silicon Smelter, including Pend Oreille County, Wash., and Bonner County, Idaho, residents and landowners located adjacent to or in the immediate vi...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(208) 448-2431
P.O. Box 159
310 Church Street
Sandpoint Idaho 83864

©2018 Priest River Times Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X