Hundreds flock to Newport smelter presentation

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  • (Photo by JUDD WILSON) Washington Department of Ecology Eastern Regional Director Grant Pfeifer told meeting attendees HiTest Silicon had not yet begun the official permitting process under the State Environmental Policy Act as of Wednesday.

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    (Photo by JUDD WILSON) Residents spoke passionately about their concerns with HiTest and Washington state officials at Newport High School Wednesday.

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    (Photo by JUDD WILSON) Local officials such as Newport Mayor Shirley Sands, pictured left, and Bonner County Commissioner Jeff Connolly, pictured right, attended Wednesday night’s HiTest silicon smelter plant presentation.

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    (Photo by JUDD WILSON) HiTest Sands Chief Operations Officer Jim May answered questions from local residents Wednesday.

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    (Photo by JUDD WILSON) Pend Oreille County Commissioner Karen Skoog opened with a plea for tolerance, good neighborliness, and patience at HiTest’s presentation Wednesday night.

  • (Photo by JUDD WILSON) Washington Department of Ecology Eastern Regional Director Grant Pfeifer told meeting attendees HiTest Silicon had not yet begun the official permitting process under the State Environmental Policy Act as of Wednesday.

  • 1

    (Photo by JUDD WILSON) Residents spoke passionately about their concerns with HiTest and Washington state officials at Newport High School Wednesday.

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    (Photo by JUDD WILSON) Local officials such as Newport Mayor Shirley Sands, pictured left, and Bonner County Commissioner Jeff Connolly, pictured right, attended Wednesday night’s HiTest silicon smelter plant presentation.

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    (Photo by JUDD WILSON) HiTest Sands Chief Operations Officer Jim May answered questions from local residents Wednesday.

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    (Photo by JUDD WILSON) Pend Oreille County Commissioner Karen Skoog opened with a plea for tolerance, good neighborliness, and patience at HiTest’s presentation Wednesday night.

NEWPORT — Hundreds of local residents learned firsthand what HiTest Sands intends to do here at a presentation Nov. 29. Earlier this year, the Canadian company bought 186 acres of land just south of Newport in order to build a silicon smelter plant that will produce silicon for solar panels. Company officials explained Nov. 29 how the plant would operate and just what the public ought to fear, or not fear, from their company. State regulators informed the public as to how the government would protect local health and environmental quality.

The plant would employ 130 workers making from $40,000 to $100,000 annually said HiTest Sands President Jayson Tymko. These jobs would require a high school diploma, GED, or associate degree and would include positions such as shift leaders, tappers, and equipment operators. Another 20 jobs would be created in plant management with annual wages of $60,000 to more than $150,000. Positions such as office support, various clerks, and more would require from a high school diploma or GED to a university degree, said Tymko. The project would be completely funded by private investors, said Tymko, and not depend on tax credits. He said all but a dozen jobs will be locally sourced, and some local hiring is already underway. The one dozen non-local workers have a combined 200 years of experience in the industry and will be critical to ensuring the plant’s safety and efficiency, said HiTest Chief Operating Officer Jim May. A silicon smelter plant in Burnsville, Miss. failed early because of a lack of experienced shift leaders, said May. It’s a small industry and HiTest’s leadership is well aware of the shortcomings of other plants and is willing to spend more money and time on the Newport plant in order to operate safely, said May. Plants in the middle of Niagara Falls, N.Y. and near Orkanger, Norway and Pocking, Germany prove that tourism, dense populations, clean environments, and silicon smelter plants can coexist side by side, said company officials.

Randy McLain asked how the company’s website could claim that no toxic gases would be released, when its presentation admitted that 1400 tons of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide would be emitted. The company will have to comply with state and federal laws regulating hazardous air pollutants, the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, regional haze and more, said Ramboll Environment air quality meteorologist and former Environmental Protection Agency regulator Bart Brashers. May explained that while the plant would emit thousands of tons of carbon dioxide, gaseous emissions from the smelter plant would contain zero heavy metals. All such metals would be trapped in the silicon due to the plant’s submerged arc furnace setup, he said. The plant will control particulate matter with methods such as misting, filters known as baghouses, dry scrubbers, and other means said May. As for those greenhouse gases, May cited a 2009 International Council of Chemical Associations study showing that for every ton of carbon dioxide emitted during the silicone process, “the use of silicones allows for savings 9 times greater” in applications such as automotive, construction, and solar energy. Bill Ellis asked how the company could claim to save on carbon emissions when its product was still to be refined further. May told him that carbon savings are assessed over the life cycle of the product, not just one stage of its development.

Along with others scared that the HiTest plant would exacerbate their breathing difficulties, a concerned teen with anaphylaxis asked, “Who will be responsible for my death?” HiTest spokesman Tim Thompson told her that the company “will do our best to never put you in that condition” of triggering an allergic reaction through releasing toxic gases. “We take very seriously your condition,” he said and offered to meet with her to further address her concerns.

HiTest’s presentation definitively claimed, “The process of making silicon metal does not lead to silicosis,” and “The dust created through the process is amorphous (rounded not angular) which does not lead to silicosis.”

At the evening’s outset Pend Oreille County Commissioner Karen Skoog pleaded for tolerance and patience during the permitting process. She said she was hopeful that together the community could find solutions and diversify the economy. Skoog and her colleagues have been excoriated by activists opposing the smelter.

Sheri Clipson asked who will hold the company compliant to environmental regulations. Idaho Rep. Heather Scott asked Washington Department of Ecology Eastern Regional Director Grant Pfeifer “How will you avoid NEPA?” She added, “I want our citizens to be represented” in the permitting process through the federal government’s National Environmental Policy Act mechanism.

Pfeifer told Scott and a representative from the Idaho Conservation League that the Washington Department of Ecology would include Idaho in its modeling and would collaborate with officials at the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. Former Idaho state senate candidate Glenn Rohrer asked HiTest officials how many trucks would use Idaho’s roads. Tymko said the company will bring in 7-8 trucks of wood chips per day and is working with BNSF to bring rail to site for its other materials. If rail were unavailable, up to 31 trucks per day would be on the roads, said Tymko.

Amidst about two dozen people who spoke during the question-and-answer portion of the evening, several retirees mentioned that they had moved to the Eastern Washington/North Idaho region from out of state and were blindsided at the prospect of an industrial plant in their adopted rural home. One new resident to Pend Oreille County claimed, “This is a done deal.”

Pfeifer explained that once the company begins the permitting process, by state and federal law the public will have multiple opportunities to share their comments and concerns with state regulators. Those concerns will have to be addressed by any plan state regulators approve, as required by law. The permitting process seems mysterious and cumbersome to the uninitiated, but as Thompson and Pfeifer stressed, the company and state want to comply with environmental law and address any concerns the public may have. To date the company had not begun the permitting process, said Pfeifer, making the evening’s symposium merely the warm-up act to a long local drama still to come.

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